NEUROBLOG 2: What we know about how the brain processes information can lead to better research design

Rachel CopeBack in January in my first neuroblog I looked at the link between the brain’s use of glucose, and how the brain processes information.  Now I’d like to explore the way we process images and how it can be used to design better research projects. Continue reading

NEUROBLOG 1: How the brain’s need for fuel can affect the quality of responses

Rachel CopeWhat we know about neuroscience might impact on how we design and deliver market and social research projects. My first ‘neuroblog’ considers the impact on decision making of the brain’s need for and use of glucose, and how we might use this relatively new learning when devising our research. Continue reading

If we’re always connected, who needs ‘wearable’ technology?

guyGRecently I’ve been reading about Apple’s long-awaited Apple watch. This would be Apple’s entry into the market of wearable technology, which is probably the most talked about area in tech. Some of the benefits of wearables being talked up are staying connected all the time, having a computer on you wherever you are, whenever you need it. Continue reading

Cycling – change in culture needed to move to the next level

Niall BakerLast week the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group (APPCG) set out their recommendations to the government, which if implemented, could facilitate significant growth in cycling across the UK.  The Get Britain Cycling report has been widely welcomed by cyclists, cycling organisations, transport and public health planners.  Continue reading

Gazing into the future through GoogleGlasses

I blogged a few weeks ago about the possibilities that the smartwatch might offer market researchers.  Of course there is one bit of kit already – well almost sort of already – out there today. Google goggles …or GoogleGlass as it is more properly known.   Continue reading

Conference speaking do’s and don’t’s: a plea from the floor

Conference speakers! Loads of you have talked to me in the last 12 months. And I have (mostly) listened. I’ve been intrigued and inspired by what some of you, elsewhere in research-land, are doing. I’ve enjoyed talking further with many of you afterwards in the queue for coffee. Continue reading

Online technologies can bolster vulnerable audience participation

Use of the internet is dramatically changing everyday lives. How many of us now send an email instead of picking up the phone or shop online instead of going out to the high street? Similarly the proportion of online research we conduct has increased rapidly. Continue reading